How to format your references using the Transportation Planning and Technology citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for Transportation Planning and Technology. For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteDownload the output style file
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Joyce, Gerald F. 2007. “Structural Biology. A Glimpse of Biology’s First Enzyme.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 315 (5818): 1507–1508.
A journal article with 2 authors
Sirotin, Yevgeniy B., and Aniruddha Das. 2009. “Anticipatory Haemodynamic Signals in Sensory Cortex Not Predicted by Local Neuronal Activity.” Nature 457 (7228): 475–479.
A journal article with 3 authors
Bredesen, Dale E., Rammohan V. Rao, and Patrick Mehlen. 2006. “Cell Death in the Nervous System.” Nature 443 (7113): 796–802.
A journal article with 11 or more authors
He, Qing Lin, Ying Hoi Lai, Yao Lu, Kam Tuen Law, and Iam Keong Sou. 2013. “Surface Reactivity Enhancement on a Pd/Bi2Te3 Heterostructure through Robust Topological Surface States.” Scientific Reports 3: 2497.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Casandjian, Charles, Noël Challamel, Christophe Lanos, and Jostein Hellesland. 2013. Reinforced Concrete Beams, Columns and Frames. Hoboken, NJ 07030 USA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
An edited book
Barth, Susanne, Donal Murphy-Bokern, Olena Kalinina, Gail Taylor, and Michael Jones, eds. 2016. Perennial Biomass Crops for a Resource-Constrained World. Cham: Springer International Publishing.
A chapter in an edited book
Williams, James. 2014. “Student Feedback on the Experience of Higher Education.” In Using Data to Improve Higher Education: Research, Policy and Practice, edited by Maria Eliophotou Menon, Dawn Geronimo Terkla, and Paul Gibbs, 67–80. Rotterdam: SensePublishers.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for Transportation Planning and Technology.

Blog post
Davis, Josh. 2015. “Scientists Have Figured Out Why Your Eyes Move When You Sleep.” IFLScience. IFLScience. https://www.iflscience.com/brain/rapid-eye-movements-during-sleep-could-denote-change-scene/.

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office. 1999. Transportation Coordination: Benefits and Barriers Exist, and Planning Efforts Progress Slowly. RCED-00-1. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Bergh, Patricia A. 2009. “Reconfiguring Academic Priorities: Through the Eyes of Michigan Community College Chief Academic Officers.” Doctoral dissertation, Phoenix, AZ: University of Phoenix.

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Kolomatsky, Michael. 2017. “Singles in the House.” New York Times, September 28.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference (Joyce 2007).
This sentence cites two references (Joyce 2007; Sirotin and Das 2009).

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors: (Sirotin and Das 2009)
  • Three authors: (Bredesen, Rao, and Mehlen 2006)
  • 4 or more authors: (He et al. 2013)

About the journal

Full journal titleTransportation Planning and Technology
AbbreviationTransp. Plan. Technol.
ISSN (print)0308-1060
ISSN (online)1029-0354
ScopeGeography, Planning and Development
Transportation

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