How to format your references using the The Neuroscientist citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for The Neuroscientist. For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteDownload the output style file
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Packer C. 2010. Genetics. A bit of Texas in Florida. Science 329:1606–1607.
A journal article with 2 authors
Singleton AB, Traynor BJ. 2015. Genetics. For complex disease genetics, collaboration drives progress. Science 347:1422–1423.
A journal article with 3 authors
Furey ML, Pietrini P, Haxby JV. 2000. Cholinergic enhancement and increased selectivity of perceptual processing during working memory. Science 290:2315–2319.
A journal article with 7 or more authors
Rosi NL, Giljohann DA, Thaxton CS, Lytton-Jean AKR, Han MS, Mirkin CA. 2006. Oligonucleotide-modified gold nanoparticles for intracellular gene regulation. Science 312:1027–1030.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Deacon M, Derry A, Mirfendereski D. 2004. Inflation-indexed Securities. Oxford, UK: John Wiley & Sons Ltd
An edited book
Arestis P, Sawyer M eds. 2016. Financial Liberalisation: Past, Present and Future. Cham: Springer International Publishing
A chapter in an edited book
Takei H, Bhattacharjee MB. 2014. Pituitary Gland. In: Zhai Q “jim,” editor. Frozen Section Library: Endocrine Organs. Frozen Section Library. New York, NY: Springer. pp. 207–231.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for The Neuroscientist.

Blog post
Andrew D. 2017. Gut Bacteria Plays A Role In Long-Term Weight Gain. IFLScience [Internet]. Available from: https://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/gut-bacteria-plays-a-role-in-longterm-weight-gain/

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office. 1973. Review of Selected Aspects of the Bilingual Education Program. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Miles CS. 2015. Elicitation of a Program’s Behaviors.

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Crow K. 2001. A Sassy Lass Makes Way for Staid. New York Times:144.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference (Packer 2010).
This sentence cites two references (Packer 2010; Singleton and Traynor 2015).

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors: (Singleton and Traynor 2015)
  • Three or more authors: (Rosi and others 2006)

About the journal

Full journal titleThe Neuroscientist
AbbreviationNeuroscientist
ISSN (print)1073-8584
ISSN (online)1089-4098
ScopeClinical Neurology
General Neuroscience

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