How to format your references using the The Journal of Modern History citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for The Journal of Modern History (JMH). For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteDownload the output style file
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Lander, Eric S. “Initial Impact of the Sequencing of the Human Genome.” Nature 470, no. 7333 (February 10, 2011): 187–97.
A journal article with 2 authors
Portegies Zwart, Simon F., and Edward P. J. van den Heuvel. “A Runaway Collision in a Young Star Cluster as the Origin of the Brightest Supernova.” Nature 450, no. 7168 (November 15, 2007): 388–89.
A journal article with 3 authors
Brohawn, Stephen G., Ernest B. Campbell, and Roderick MacKinnon. “Physical Mechanism for Gating and Mechanosensitivity of the Human TRAAK K+ Channel.” Nature 516, no. 7529 (December 4, 2014): 126–30.
A journal article with 11 or more authors
McNamara, John M., Zoltan Barta, Lutz Fromhage, and Alasdair I. Houston. “The Coevolution of Choosiness and Cooperation.” Nature 451, no. 7175 (January 10, 2008): 189–92.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Saksena, Franklin B. Color Atlas of Local and Systemic Signs of Cardiovascular Disease. Oxford, UK, 2008.
An edited book
San-Julian, Mikel, and José Cañadell, eds. Pediatric Bone Sarcomas: Epiphysiolysis before Excision. London, 2009.
A chapter in an edited book
Singh, Jawar, Saraju P. Mohanty, and Dhiraj K. Pradhan. “SRAM Bitcell Design Using Unidirectional Devices.” In Robust SRAM Designs and Analysis, edited by Saraju P. Mohanty and Dhiraj K. Pradhan, 113–36. New York, NY, 2013.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for The Journal of Modern History.

Blog post
Andrews, Robin. “Bacteria Are Evolving To Eat The Plastic We Dump Into The Oceans.” IFLScience. May 31, 2017.

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office. “Aviation Security: Progress Made, but Challenges Persist in Meeting the Screening Mandate for Air Cargo.” Washington, DC, March 9, 2011.

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Barrett, Courtenay. “Racial Congruence and Its Effects on Social Integration and School Involvement: A Multi-Level Model.” Doctoral dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park, 2010.

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Santora, Marc. “Mounting Subway Delays Cost Riders Millions Every Year, Report Finds.” New York Times, October 12, 2017.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference Eric S. Lander, “Initial Impact of the Sequencing of the Human Genome,” Nature 470, no. 7333 (February 10, 2011): 187–97..
This sentence cites two references Eric S. Lander, “Initial Impact of the Sequencing of the Human Genome,” Nature 470, no. 7333 (February 10, 2011): 187–97; Simon F. Portegies Zwart and Edward P. J. van den Heuvel, “A Runaway Collision in a Young Star Cluster as the Origin of the Brightest Supernova,” Nature 450, no. 7168 (November 15, 2007): 388–89..

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors: Simon F. Portegies Zwart and Edward P. J. van den Heuvel, “A Runaway Collision in a Young Star Cluster as the Origin of the Brightest Supernova,” Nature 450, no. 7168 (November 15, 2007): 388–89.
  • Three authors: Stephen G. Brohawn, Ernest B. Campbell, and Roderick MacKinnon, “Physical Mechanism for Gating and Mechanosensitivity of the Human TRAAK K+ Channel,” Nature 516, no. 7529 (December 4, 2014): 126–30.
  • 4 or more authors: John M. McNamara et al., “The Coevolution of Choosiness and Cooperation,” Nature 451, no. 7175 (January 10, 2008): 189–92.

About the journal

Full journal titleThe Journal of Modern History
AbbreviationJ. Mod. Hist.
ISSN (print)0022-2801
ISSN (online)1537-5358
ScopeHistory

Other styles