How to format your references using the Journal of Historical Linguistics citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for Journal of Historical Linguistics (JHL). For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteFind the style here: output styles overview
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Reichhardt, Tony. 2005. Pumping up the volume. Nature 436:7049.326–327.
A journal article with 2 authors
Neuman, Yair & Yochai Cohen. 2014. A vectorial semantics approach to personality assessment. Scientific reports 4.4761.
A journal article with 3 authors
Gestwicki, Jason E., Gerald R. Crabtree, & Isabella A. Graef. 2004. Harnessing chaperones to generate small-molecule inhibitors of amyloid beta aggregation. Science (New York, N.Y.) 306:5697.865–869.
A journal article with 4 or more authors
White, Richard Mark, Jennifer Cech, Sutheera Ratanasirintrawoot, Charles Y. Lin, Peter B. Rahl, Christopher J. Burke, Erin Langdon, Matthew L. Tomlinson, Jack Mosher, Charles Kaufman, Frank Chen, Hannah K. Long, Martin Kramer, Sumon Datta, Donna Neuberg, Scott Granter, Richard A. Young, Sean Morrison, Grant N. Wheeler, & Leonard I. Zon. 2011. DHODH modulates transcriptional elongation in the neural crest and melanoma. Nature 471:7339.518–522.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Lui, S.H. 2011. Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
An edited book
Luca, Ioana. 2016. Shallow Geophysical Mass Flows down Arbitrary Topography: Model Equations in Topography-fitted Coordinates, Numerical Simulation and Back-calculations of Disastrous Events (YC Tai and CY Kuo, Eds.). Cham: Springer International Publishing.
A chapter in an edited book
Cabot, Jordi, Robert Clarisó, & Daniel Riera. 2009. Verifying UML/OCL Operation Contracts. Integrated Formal Methods: 7th International Conference, IFM 2009, Düsseldorf, Germany, February 16-19, 2009. Proceedings ed. by Leuschel Michael & Heike Wehrheim, 40–55. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for Journal of Historical Linguistics.

Blog post
Fang, Janet. 2014. Even Death Doesn’t Stop Geckos From Sticking To The Walls. IFLScience.

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office. 2001. International Trade: Concerns Over Biotechnology Challenge U.S. Agricultural Exports. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Roberts, Elaine Morris. 2006. Whose Books Get Published?: Individual Agency and the Business of Children’s Publishing. Unpublished thesis, University of Cincinnati.

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Walsh, Mary Williams. 2016. Treasury Official Urges Relief for Puerto Rico, but Lawmakers Fear Fallout. New York TimesB3.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference (Reichhardt 2005).
This sentence cites two references (Reichhardt 2005, Neuman & Cohen 2014).

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors: (Neuman & Cohen 2014)
  • Three authors: (Gestwicki, Crabtree, & Graef 2004)
  • 4 or more authors: (White et al. 2011)

About the journal

Full journal titleJournal of Historical Linguistics
AbbreviationJ. Hist. Linguist.
ISSN (print)2210-2116
ISSN (online)2210-2124
ScopeLanguage and Linguistics
Linguistics and Language

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