How to format your references using the Human Resource Development International citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for Human Resource Development International. For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteDownload the output style file
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Sawyers, Charles L. 2013. “Perspective: Combined Forces.” Nature 498 (7455): S7.
A journal article with 2 authors
Holland, Matthew D., and Alan Hastings. 2008. “Strong Effect of Dispersal Network Structure on Ecological Dynamics.” Nature 456 (7223): 792–794.
A journal article with 3 authors
Okuda, Suguru, Elizaveta Freinkman, and Daniel Kahne. 2012. “Cytoplasmic ATP Hydrolysis Powers Transport of Lipopolysaccharide across the Periplasm in E. Coli.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 338 (6111): 1214–1217.
A journal article with 11 or more authors
Repp, Jascha, Gerhard Meyer, Sami Paavilainen, Fredrik E. Olsson, and Mats Persson. 2006. “Imaging Bond Formation between a Gold Atom and Pentacene on an Insulating Surface.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 312 (5777): 1196–1199.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Schwartz, Pepper, and Martha Kempner. 2015. 50 Great Myths of Human Sexuality. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
An edited book
Müller, Thomas, ed. 2014. Nuel Belnap on Indeterminism and Free Action. Vol. 2. Outstanding Contributions to Logic. Cham: Springer International Publishing.
A chapter in an edited book
Zhu, Junguo, Muyun Yang, Sheng Li, and Tiejun Zhao. 2016. “Learning Bilingual Sentence Representations for Quality Estimation of Machine Translation.” In Machine Translation: 12th China Workshop, CWMT 2016, Urumqi, China, August 25–26, 2016, Revised Selected Papers, edited by Muyun Yang and Shujie Liu, 35–42. Communications in Computer and Information Science. Singapore: Springer.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for Human Resource Development International.

Blog post
Fang, Janet. 2015. “Different Monkey Species Can Understand One Another’s ‘Languages.’” IFLScience. IFLScience. https://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/monkeys-use-suffixes-too/.

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office. 1988. Airline Scheduling: Airline Practices in Establishing and Maintaining Connecting Times. RCED-88-207. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Williams Soberanes, Claudia. 2012. “Experiences of Mexican Immigrant Women Living in the Washington D.C. Metropolitan Area.” Doctoral dissertation, Washington, DC: George Washington University.

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Hodara, Susan. 2013. “Creative Answers for the Gift List.” New York Times, December 15.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference (Sawyers 2013).
This sentence cites two references (Sawyers 2013; Sawyers 2013).

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors: (Holland and Hastings 2008)
  • Three authors: (Okuda, Freinkman, and Kahne 2012)
  • 4 or more authors: (Repp et al. 2006)

About the journal

Full journal titleHuman Resource Development International
AbbreviationHum. Resour. Dev. Int.
ISSN (print)1367-8868
ISSN (online)1469-8374
ScopeOrganizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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