How to format your references using the Feminist Media Studies citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for Feminist Media Studies. For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteFind the style here: output styles overview
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Meyerowitz, Elliot M. 2002. “Plants Compared to Animals: The Broadest Comparative Study of Development.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 295 (5559): 1482–1485.
A journal article with 2 authors
Lerman, Joshua, and Bernhard O. Palsson. 2010. “Microbiology. Topping off a Multiscale Balancing Act.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 330 (6007): 1058–1059.
A journal article with 3 authors
Loeffler, J. M., D. Nelson, and V. A. Fischetti. 2001. “Rapid Killing of Streptococcus Pneumoniae with a Bacteriophage Cell Wall Hydrolase.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 294 (5549): 2170–2172.
A journal article with 11 or more authors
Saitoe, M., T. L. Schwarz, J. A. Umbach, C. B. Gundersen, and Y. Kidokoro. 2001. “Absence of Junctional Glutamate Receptor Clusters in Drosophila Mutants Lacking Spontaneous Transmitter Release.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 293 (5529): 514–517.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Levy, David. 2011. Practical Diabetes Care. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
An edited book
Rumley, Dennis, Vivian Louis Forbes, and Christopher Griffin, eds. 2006. Australia’s Arc of Instability: The Political and Cultural Dynamics of Regional Security. Vol. 82. The GeoJournal Library. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands.
A chapter in an edited book
Sharapov, Valeriy, Zhanna Sotula, and Larisa Kunickaya. 2014. “Transducers with Non-Destructive Control.” In Piezo-Electric Electro-Acoustic Transducers, edited by Zhanna Sotula and Larisa Kunickaya, 73–89. Microtechnology and MEMS. Cham: Springer International Publishing.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for Feminist Media Studies.

Blog post
Andrew, Elise. 2014. “Researchers Develop Highly Effective Vaccine To Diarrhea Causing Bacterium.” IFLScience. IFLScience. https://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/researchers-develop-highly-effective-vaccine-diarrhea-causing-bacterium/.

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office. 1999. Consolidated Education Planning: State Education Agencies’ Implementation of Consolidated Planning at the Local Level. HEHS-99-33R. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Nuno, Zachary Sebastian. 2012. “Visible and Mid-Infrared Optical Studies of Plasmon and Phonon Resonant Nanoparticles Using Apertureless near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy.” Doctoral dissertation, Long Beach, CA: California State University, Long Beach.

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Billard, Mary. 2010. “Ride Home With It.” New York Times, April 29.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference (Meyerowitz 2002).
This sentence cites two references (Meyerowitz 2002; Lerman and Palsson 2010).

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors: (Lerman and Palsson 2010)
  • Three authors: (Loeffler, Nelson, and Fischetti 2001)
  • 4 or more authors: (Saitoe et al. 2001)

About the journal

Full journal titleFeminist Media Studies
AbbreviationFem. Media Stud.
ISSN (print)1468-0777
ISSN (online)1471-5902
ScopeVisual Arts and Performing Arts
Communication
Gender Studies

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