How to format your references using the American Review of Canadian Studies citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for American Review of Canadian Studies. For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteDownload the output style file
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Borniger, Jeremy C. 2015. “Leaping into the Unknown.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 350 (6262): 882.
A journal article with 2 authors
Turelli, Priscilla, and Didier Trono. 2005. “Editing at the Crossroad of Innate and Adaptive Immunity.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 307 (5712): 1061–1065.
A journal article with 3 authors
Inaba, Masafumi, Hiroaki Yamanaka, and Shigeru Kondo. 2012. “Pigment Pattern Formation by Contact-Dependent Depolarization.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 335 (6069): 677.
A journal article with 11 or more authors
Smith, David E., Maria T. Zuber, Xiaoli Sun, Gregory A. Neumann, John F. Cavanaugh, Jan F. McGarry, and Thomas W. Zagwodzki. 2006. “Two-Way Laser Link over Interplanetary Distance.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 311 (5757): 53.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Dubil, Robert. 2011. Financial Engineering and Arbitrage in the Financial Markets. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
An edited book
Dannen, Chris. 2011. Beginning IOS Apps with Facebook and Twitter APIs: For IPhone, IPad, and IPod Touch. Edited by Christopher White. Berkeley, CA: Apress.
A chapter in an edited book
Braff, M. H., and R. L. Gallo. 2006. “Antimicrobial Peptides: An Essential Component of the Skin Defensive Barrier.” In Antimicrobial Peptides and Human Disease, edited by William M. Shafer, 91–110. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for American Review of Canadian Studies.

Blog post
O`Callaghan, Jonathan. 2015. “Space Plane Company Develops Revolutionary Hybrid Rocket Engine That Could Take You Anywhere In The World In Four Hours.” IFLScience. IFLScience. https://www.iflscience.com/space/space-plane-company-receives-funding-develop-their-revolutionary-hybrid-rocket-engine/.

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office. 1997. Deferred Maintenance: Reporting Requirements and Identified Issues. AIMD-97-103R. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Beaven, Lindsey. 2014. “Epiphanies of Soul: ‘When the Bolts of the Universe Fly Open.’ A Depth Psychological Contemplation of Wonder.” Doctoral dissertation, Carpinteria, CA: Pacifica Graduate Institute.

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Kanter, James. 2017. “Head of European Council Reappointed Over Protest.” New York Times, March 9.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference (Borniger 2015).
This sentence cites two references (Borniger 2015; Turelli and Trono 2005).

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors: (Turelli and Trono 2005)
  • Three authors: (Inaba, Yamanaka, and Kondo 2012)
  • 4 or more authors: (Smith et al. 2006)

About the journal

Full journal titleAmerican Review of Canadian Studies
AbbreviationAm. Rev. Can. Stud.
ISSN (print)0272-2011
ISSN (online)1943-9954
ScopeEarth-Surface Processes
Geography, Planning and Development

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