How to format your references using the Yearbook of English Studies citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for Yearbook of English Studies. For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteFind the style here: output styles overview
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Varki, Ajit, ‘Glycan-Based Interactions Involving Vertebrate Sialic-Acid-Recognizing Proteins’, Nature, 446.7139 (2007), 1023–29
A journal article with 2 authors
Schindler, Daniel E., and Ray Hilborn, ‘Sustainability. Prediction, Precaution, and Policy under Global Change’, Science (New York, N.Y.), 347.6225 (2015), 953–54
A journal article with 3 authors
Hong, Weizhe, Timothy J. Mosca, and Liqun Luo, ‘Teneurins Instruct Synaptic Partner Matching in an Olfactory Map’, Nature, 484.7393 (2012), 201–7
A journal article with 7 or more authors
Kim, Kyung Hwan, Alexander Späh, Harshad Pathak, Fivos Perakis, Daniel Mariedahl, Katrin Amann-Winkel, and others, ‘Response to Comment on “Maxima in the Thermodynamic Response and Correlation Functions of Deeply Supercooled Water”’, Science (New York, N.Y.), 360.6390 (2018)

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Maguire, Laurie, and Emma Smith, 30 Great Myths about Shakespeare (Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2012)
An edited book
Mirceski, Valentin, Square-Wave Voltammetry: Theory and Application, ed. by Sebojka Komorsky-Lovric and Milivoj Lovric, Monographs in Electrochemistry (Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer, 2007)
A chapter in an edited book
Einarsdóttir, Dóróthea M., Andri Arnaldsson, Finnbogi Óskarsson, and Hannes Jónsson, ‘Path Optimization with Application to Tunneling’, in Applied Parallel and Scientific Computing: 10th International Conference, PARA 2010, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 6-9, 2010, Revised Selected Papers, Part II, ed. by Kristján Jónasson, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer, 2012), pp. 45–55

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for Yearbook of English Studies.

Blog post
Carpineti, Alfredo, ‘Echoless Light Observed For The First Time’, IFLScience (IFLScience, 2015)

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office, National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Significant Actions Needed to Address Long-Standing Financial Management Problems (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 19 May 2004)

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Janice, Josephine, ‘Preschoolers’ Prosocial Responding to Social Others’ Distress’ (unpublished Doctoral dissertation, University of Louisiana, 2017)

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
O’connor, George, ‘All at Sea’, New York Times, 16 June 2017, p. BR15

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference Ajit Varki, ‘Glycan-Based Interactions Involving Vertebrate Sialic-Acid-Recognizing Proteins’, Nature, 446.7139 (2007), 1023–29..
This sentence cites two references Ajit Varki, ‘Glycan-Based Interactions Involving Vertebrate Sialic-Acid-Recognizing Proteins’, Nature, 446.7139 (2007), 1023–29; Daniel E. Schindler and Ray Hilborn, ‘Sustainability. Prediction, Precaution, and Policy under Global Change’, Science (New York, N.Y.), 347.6225 (2015), 953–54 <https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1261824>..

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors:
  • Three authors:
  • 4 or more authors: Kyung Hwan Kim and others, ‘Response to Comment on “Maxima in the Thermodynamic Response and Correlation Functions of Deeply Supercooled Water”’, Science (New York, N.Y.), 360.6390 (2018) <https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aat1729>.

About the journal

Full journal titleYearbook of English Studies
ISSN (print)0306-2473
ISSN (online)2222-4289
Scope

Other styles