How to format your references using the The Journal of Transport History citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for The Journal of Transport History (JTH). For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteDownload the output style file
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Brian K. McNab, “Metabolism: ecology shapes bird bioenergetics”, Nature 426:6967 (2003), 620–1.
A journal article with 2 authors
N. Yoshida and S. Toyoda, “Constraining the atmospheric N2O budget from intramolecular site preference in N2O isotopomers”, Nature 405:6784 (2000), 330–4.
A journal article with 3 authors
Laith J. Abu-Raddad, Padmaja Patnaik and James G. Kublin, “Dual infection with HIV and malaria fuels the spread of both diseases in sub-Saharan Africa”, Science (New York, N.Y.) 314:5805 (2006), 1603–6.
A journal article with 4 or more authors
Kinneret Keren, Michael Krueger, Rachel Gilad, Gdalyahu Ben-Yoseph, Uri Sivan and Erez Braun, “Sequence-specific molecular lithography on single DNA molecules”, Science (New York, N.Y.) 297:5578 (2002), 72–5.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Dan Kaszeta, CBRN and Hazmat Incidents at Major Public Events, (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2012).
An edited book
Ron Shepard, Russell M. Pitzer and Thom Dunning (eds.), Isaiah Shavitt: A Memorial Festschrift from Theoretical Chemistry Accounts, 1st ed. 2016 (Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer, 2016), ix.
A chapter in an edited book
Jean Guex, Federico Galster and Øyvind Hammer, “The UA Method and the UAgraph Program”, in Federico Galster and Øyvind Hammer (ed.), Discrete Biochronological Time Scales (Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2016), 27–50.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for The Journal of Transport History.

Blog post
Tom Hale, “NASA’s Solar Observatory Does A Corkscrew Spin And Gets Some Amazing Images”, IFLScience (IFLScience, 2016) <https://www.iflscience.com/space/nasa-s-solar-observatory-does-a-corkscrew-spin-and-gets-some-amazing-images/> [accessed 30 October 2018].

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office, ADP Budget: Analysis of HCFA’s Fiscal Year 1991 ADP Budget Request, (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 28 September 1990).

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Meghann Herron, “Prescripton labels: Do you know what medication you are taking?”, (unpublished Doctoral dissertation, Long Beach, CA: California State University, Long Beach, 2013).

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Linda Greenhouse, “Court to Weigh Disparities in Cocaine Laws”, New York Times, 12 June 2007, A15.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference Brian K. McNab, “Metabolism: ecology shapes bird bioenergetics”, Nature 426:6967 (2003), 620–1..
This sentence cites two references Brian K. McNab, “Metabolism: ecology shapes bird bioenergetics”, Nature 426:6967 (2003), 620–1; N. Yoshida and S. Toyoda, “Constraining the atmospheric N2O budget from intramolecular site preference in N2O isotopomers”, Nature 405:6784 (2000), 330–4..

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors:
  • Three authors:
  • 4 or more authors: Kinneret Keren et al., “Sequence-specific molecular lithography on single DNA molecules”, Science (New York, N.Y.) 297:5578 (2002), 72–5.

About the journal

Full journal titleThe Journal of Transport History
ISSN (print)0022-5266
ISSN (online)1759-3999
Scope

Other styles