How to format your references using the Museum Management and Curatorship citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for Museum Management and Curatorship. For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteDownload the output style file
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Smaglik, Paul. 2002. “An Electoral Lecture.” Nature 420 (6915): 3.
A journal article with 2 authors
Sanguinetti, Michael C., and Martin Tristani-Firouzi. 2006. “HERG Potassium Channels and Cardiac Arrhythmia.” Nature 440 (7083): 463–469.
A journal article with 3 authors
Schuck, Carsten, Wolfram H. P. Pernice, and Hong X. Tang. 2013. “Waveguide Integrated Low Noise NbTiN Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors with Milli-Hz Dark Count Rate.” Scientific Reports 3: 1893.
A journal article with 11 or more authors
Bogdanovich, Sasha, Thomas O. B. Krag, Elisabeth R. Barton, Linda D. Morris, Lisa-Anne Whittemore, Rexford S. Ahima, and Tejvir S. Khurana. 2002. “Functional Improvement of Dystrophic Muscle by Myostatin Blockade.” Nature 420 (6914): 418–421.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Kumar, Vijay. 2006. Mobile Database Systems. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
An edited book
Hornsby, Kathleen Stewart, Christophe Claramunt, Michel Denis, and Gérard Ligozat, eds. 2009. Spatial Information Theory: 9th International Conference, COSIT 2009 Aber Wrac’h, France, September 21-25, 2009 Proceedings. Vol. 5756. Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer.
A chapter in an edited book
Eglash, Ron, and Colin Garvey. 2014. “Basins of Attraction for Generative Justice.” In Chaos Theory in Politics, edited by Santo Banerjee, Şefika Şule Erçetin, and Ali Tekin, 75–88. Understanding Complex Systems. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for Museum Management and Curatorship.

Blog post
Andrew, Elise. 2016. “Why Do Only Some People Get ‘Skin Orgasms’ From Listening To Music?” IFLScience. IFLScience. https://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/why-do-only-some-people-get-skin-orgasms-listening-music/.

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office. 1985. Pell Grant Validation Imposes Some Costs and Does Not Greatly Reduce Award Errors: New Strategies Are Needed. PEMD-85-10. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Bradley, Kristen A. 2014. “A Tennessee Irish Picnic: Foodways and Complex Community Dynamics.” Doctoral dissertation, Lafayette, LA: University of Louisiana.

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Sisario, Ben. 2017. “Verses of Civil Rights Anthem ‘We Shall Overcome’ Are Ruled Not Under Copyright.” New York Times, September 9.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference (Smaglik 2002).
This sentence cites two references (Smaglik 2002; Sanguinetti and Tristani-Firouzi 2006).

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors: (Sanguinetti and Tristani-Firouzi 2006)
  • Three authors: (Schuck, Pernice, and Tang 2013)
  • 4 or more authors: (Bogdanovich et al. 2002)

About the journal

Full journal titleMuseum Management and Curatorship
ISSN (print)0964-7775
ISSN (online)1872-9185
ScopeVisual Arts and Performing Arts
Business and International Management
Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

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