How to format your references using the Critical Public Health citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for Critical Public Health. For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteDownload the output style file
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Marx, Vivien. 2014. “Cancer Treatment: Sharp Shooters.” Nature 508 (7494): 133–138.
A journal article with 2 authors
Carter, Luther J., and Thomas H. Pigford. 2005. “Nuclear Waste. Proof of Safety at Yucca Mountain.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 310 (5747): 447–448.
A journal article with 3 authors
Hines, Pamela J., Barbara R. Jasny, and Jeffrey Mervis. 2009. “Adding a T to the Three R’s. Education & Technology. Introduction.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 323 (5910): 53.
A journal article with 11 or more authors
Prochnik, Simon E., James Umen, Aurora M. Nedelcu, Armin Hallmann, Stephen M. Miller, Ichiro Nishii, Patrick Ferris, et al. 2010. “Genomic Analysis of Organismal Complexity in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox Carteri.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 329 (5988): 223–226.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Corns, Thomas N. 2008. A History of Seventeenth-Century English Literature. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
An edited book
Heymann, Warren R., ed. 2008. Thyroid Disorders with Cutaneous Manifestations. London: Springer.
A chapter in an edited book
Güner-Özbek, Meltem Deniz. 2011. “Extended Scope of the Rotterdam Rules: Maritime Plus and Conflict of the Extension with the Extensions of Other Transport Law Conventions.” In The United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Carriage of Goods Wholly or Partly by Sea: An Appraisal of the “Rotterdam Rules,” edited by Meltem Deniz Güner-Özbek, 107–138. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for Critical Public Health.

Blog post
O`Callaghan, Jonathan. 2015. “NASA Delays First Manned Mission Of Mars-Bound Orion Spacecraft To 2023.” IFLScience. IFLScience. https://www.iflscience.com/space/nasa-delays-first-manned-mission-mars-bound-orion-spacecraft-2023/.

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office. 2006. Offshoring: U.S. Semiconductor and Software Industries Increasingly Produce in China and India. GAO-06-423. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Crider, Mary C. 2012. “The Social and Environmental Effects of Shrimp Mariculture: Case Studies of Two Coastal Villages in Ecuador.” Doctoral dissertation, Boca Raton, FL: Florida Atlantic University.

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Crow, Kelly. 2000. “Midnight at the Oasis, as Restaurant’s Lease Is Withdrawn.” New York Times, July 9.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference (Marx 2014).
This sentence cites two references (Marx 2014; Carter and Pigford 2005).

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors: (Carter and Pigford 2005)
  • Three authors: (Hines, Jasny, and Mervis 2009)
  • 4 or more authors: (Prochnik et al. 2010)

About the journal

Full journal titleCritical Public Health
AbbreviationCrit. Public Health
ISSN (print)0958-1596
ISSN (online)1469-3682
ScopePublic Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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