How to format your references using the Oxford German Studies citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for Oxford German Studies. For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteFind the style here: output styles overview
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Tobias, Joseph A., ‘Biodiversity: Hidden Impacts of Logging’, Nature, 523.7559 (2015), 163–64
A journal article with 2 authors
Gantz, Valentino M., and Ethan Bier, ‘Genome Editing. The Mutagenic Chain Reaction: A Method for Converting Heterozygous to Homozygous Mutations’, Science (New York, N.Y.), 348.6233 (2015), 442–44
A journal article with 3 authors
Couch, S., R. S. Sparks, and M. R. Carroll, ‘Mineral Disequilibrium in Lavas Explained by Convective Self-Mixing in Open Magma Chambers’, Nature, 411.6841 (2001), 1037–39
A journal article with 7 or more authors
Hancox, Cindy I., S. Charles Doret, Matthew T. Hummon, Linjiao Luo, and John M. Doyle, ‘Magnetic Trapping of Rare-Earth Atoms at Millikelvin Temperatures’, Nature, 431.7006 (2004), 281–84

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Walter, R. J., Local Emergency Planning Committee Guidebook (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1998)
An edited book
Richards, John A., ed., Radio Wave Propagation: An Introduction for the Non-Specialist (Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer, 2008)
A chapter in an edited book
Simón Mata, Antonio, Alex Bataller Torras, Juan Antonio Cabrera Carrillo, Francisco Ezquerro Juanco, Antonio Jesús Guerra Fernández, Fernando Nadal Martínez, and others, ‘Balancing of Machinery’, in Fundamentals of Machine Theory and Mechanisms, ed. by Alex Bataller Torras, Juan Antonio Cabrera Carrillo, Francisco Ezquerro Juanco, Antonio Jesús Guerra Fernández, Fernando Nadal Martínez, and Antonio Ortiz Fernández, Mechanisms and Machine Science (Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2016), pp. 195–231

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for Oxford German Studies.

Blog post
Andrew, Danielle, ‘Time Travel: A Conversation Between A Scientist And A Literature Professor’, IFLScience (IFLScience, 2017) <https://www.iflscience.com/editors-blog/time-travel-a-conversation-between-a-scientist-and-a-literature-professor/> [accessed 30 October 2018]

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office, Information Technology: Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys Needs to Institutionalize Key IT Management Disciplines (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 25 July 2003)

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
Lanza, Kerry M., ‘The Antecedents of Automotive Brand Loyalty and Repurchase Intentions’ (unpublished Doctoral dissertation, University of Phoenix, 2008)

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Greenhouse, Linda, ‘Justices Support Guidelines for Sentencing’, New York Times, 22 June 2007, p. A18

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference Joseph A. Tobias, ‘Biodiversity: Hidden Impacts of Logging’, Nature, 523.7559 (2015), 163–64..
This sentence cites two references Joseph A. Tobias, ‘Biodiversity: Hidden Impacts of Logging’, Nature, 523.7559 (2015), 163–64; Valentino M. Gantz and Ethan Bier, ‘Genome Editing. The Mutagenic Chain Reaction: A Method for Converting Heterozygous to Homozygous Mutations’, Science (New York, N.Y.), 348.6233 (2015), 442–44..

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors:
  • Three authors:
  • 4 or more authors: Cindy I. Hancox and others, ‘Magnetic Trapping of Rare-Earth Atoms at Millikelvin Temperatures’, Nature, 431.7006 (2004), 281–84.

About the journal

Full journal titleOxford German Studies
AbbreviationOxf. Ger. Stud.
ISSN (print)0078-7191
ISSN (online)1745-9214
ScopeLanguage and Linguistics
Literature and Literary Theory
Linguistics and Language

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