How to format your references using the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for Journal of Public Policy & Marketing. For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteDownload the output style file
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
Feldman, D. E. (2014), “Physics. Electronically erased,” Science (New York, N.Y.), 344 (6190), 1344–45.
A journal article with 2 authors
Krushelnick, Karl and Steve Cowley (2005), “Physics. Reduced turbulence and new opportunities for fusion,” Science (New York, N.Y.), 309 (5740), 1502–3.
A journal article with 3 authors
Oliveira, Giselle de Almeida, Joshua Lieberman, and Carolina Barillas-Mury (2012), “Epithelial nitration by a peroxidase/NOX5 system mediates mosquito antiplasmodial immunity,” Science (New York, N.Y.), 335 (6070), 856–59.
A journal article with 4 or more authors
Mower, Jeffrey P., Sasa Stefanović, Gregory J. Young, and Jeffrey D. Palmer (2004), “Plant genetics: gene transfer from parasitic to host plants,” Nature, 432 (7014), 165–66.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
Barone, Stefano and Eva Lo Franco (2012), Statistical and Managerial Techniques for Six Sigma Methodology, Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
An edited book
Jacobson, Michael and Daniel Ciolkosz (Eds.) (2013), Wood-Based Energy in the Northern Forests, New York, NY: Springer.
A chapter in an edited book
Zhao, Aidi, Hui Zhang, and J. G. Hou (2012), “Electron Transport in Single Molecules and Nanostructures,” in Microsystems and Nanotechnology, Z. Zhou, Z. Wang, and L. Lin, eds., Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer, 149–83.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for Journal of Public Policy & Marketing.

Blog post
Andrew, Elise (2014), “Japan Banned From Antarctic Whaling,” IFLScience, IFLScience, (accessed October 30, 2018), [available at https://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/japan-banned-antarctic-whaling/].

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
Government Accountability Office (2005), “Aviation Security: Transportation Security Administration Did Not Fully Disclose Uses of Personal Information During Secure Flight Program Testing in Initial Privacy Notes, but Has Recently Taken Steps to More Fully Inform the Public,” Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
DeSpain, Lynn (2008), “The relationship between police supervisor training and job satisfaction levels as reported by patrol officers,” Doctoral dissertation, Phoenix, AZ: University of Phoenix.

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
Walsh, Mary Williams (2011), “A Proposal for Drawing a Clearer Picture of Public Pension Finances,” New York Times, B6.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by name and year in parentheses:

This sentence cites one reference (Feldman 2014).
This sentence cites two references (Feldman 2014; Krushelnick and Cowley 2005).

Here are examples of in-text citations with multiple authors:

  • Two authors: (Krushelnick and Cowley 2005)
  • Three authors: (Oliveira, Lieberman, and Barillas-Mury 2012)
  • 4 or more authors: (Mower et al. 2004)

About the journal

Full journal titleJournal of Public Policy & Marketing
ISSN (print)0743-9156
ISSN (online)1547-7207
ScopeBusiness and International Management
Marketing
Economics and Econometrics

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