How to format your references using the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue internationale de Sémiotique juridique citation style

This is a short guide how to format citations and the bibliography in a manuscript for International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue internationale de Sémiotique juridique. For a complete guide how to prepare your manuscript refer to the journal's instructions to authors.

Using reference management software

Typically you don't format your citations and bibliography by hand. The easiest way is to use a reference manager:

PaperpileThe citation style is built in and you can choose it in Settings > Citation Style or Paperpile > Citation Style in Google Docs.
EndNoteFind the style here: output styles overview
Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, and othersThe style is either built in or you can download a CSL file that is supported by most references management programs.
BibTeXBibTeX syles are usually part of a LaTeX template. Check the instructions to authors if the publisher offers a LaTeX template for this journal.

Journal articles

Those examples are references to articles in scholarly journals and how they are supposed to appear in your bibliography.

Not all journals organize their published articles in volumes and issues, so these fields are optional. Some electronic journals do not provide a page range, but instead list an article identifier. In a case like this it's safe to use the article identifier instead of the page range.

A journal article with 1 author
1.
Ray, Animesh. 2005. Plant genetics: RNA cache or genome trash? Nature 437: E1-2; discussion E2.
A journal article with 2 authors
1.
Aaronson, David S., and Curt M. Horvath. 2002. A road map for those who don’t know JAK-STAT. Science (New York, N.Y.) 296: 1653–1655.
A journal article with 3 authors
1.
Jeffrey, Jenna L., Jack A. Terrett, and David W. C. MacMillan. 2015. O-H hydrogen bonding promotes H-atom transfer from α C-H bonds for C-alkylation of alcohols. Science (New York, N.Y.) 349: 1532–1536.
A journal article with 11 or more authors
1.
Lee, Seul Ji, Sung-Il Woo, Soo Hyun Ahn, Dong Kyu Lim, Ji Yeon Hong, Jeong Hill Park, Johan Lim, Mi-Kyeong Kim, and Sung Won Kwon. 2014. Functional interpretation of metabolomics data as a new method for predicting long-term side effects: treatment of atopic dermatitis in infants. Scientific reports 4: 7408.

Books and book chapters

Here are examples of references for authored and edited books as well as book chapters.

An authored book
1.
Wagner-Martin, Linda. 2012. A History of American Literature. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
An edited book
1.
Palang, Hannes, Helen Sooväli, and Anu Printsmann, ed. 2007. Seasonal Landscapes. Vol. 7. Landscape Series. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands.
A chapter in an edited book
1.
Rose, Sherri, and Mark J. van der Laan. 2011. Understanding TMLE. In Targeted Learning: Causal Inference for Observational and Experimental Data, ed. Sherri Rose, 83–100. Springer Series in Statistics. New York, NY: Springer.

Web sites

Sometimes references to web sites should appear directly in the text rather than in the bibliography. Refer to the Instructions to authors for International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue internationale de Sémiotique juridique.

Blog post
1.
Andrew, Elise. 2015. Rise in Oklahoma Earthquakes Linked to Oil and Gas Activity. IFLScience. IFLScience. June 22.

Reports

This example shows the general structure used for government reports, technical reports, and scientific reports. If you can't locate the report number then it might be better to cite the report as a book. For reports it is usually not individual people that are credited as authors, but a governmental department or agency like "U. S. Food and Drug Administration" or "National Cancer Institute".

Government report
1.
Government Accountability Office. 1993. Tax Administration: Achieving Business and Technical Goals In Tax Systems Modernization. T-GGD-93-24. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Theses and dissertations

Theses including Ph.D. dissertations, Master's theses or Bachelor theses follow the basic format outlined below.

Doctoral dissertation
1.
Webb, C. Travis. 2009. “The mirroring that binds into freedom”: Stevens, Jeffers, Heidegger and the inhuman. Doctoral dissertation, Long Beach, CA: California State University, Long Beach.

News paper articles

Unlike scholarly journals, news papers do not usually have a volume and issue number. Instead, the full date and page number is required for a correct reference.

New York Times article
1.
Walsh, Mary Williams. 2011. Contractor’s Work Faulted At U.S. Pension Guarantor. New York Times, December 2.

In-text citations

References should be cited in the text by sequential numbers in square brackets:

This sentence cites one reference [1].
This sentence cites two references [1, 2].
This sentence cites four references [1–4].

About the journal

Full journal titleInternational Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue internationale de Sémiotique juridique
AbbreviationInt. J. Semiot. Law
ISSN (print)0952-8059
ISSN (online)1572-8722
ScopeLanguage and Linguistics
Law

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